Castro Amoah

4th August 2015

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How long have you been working as a Project Host or Co-ordinator for World Challenge?  
I have been working as project host for the past three years and enjoy every minute of it!
 
What type of community projects do you get involved in and where?
We are mainly involved in construction (concreting, moulding cement blocks, sand-filling etc.) and beautification (painting, sanitation work) in the central region of Ghana in a town called Mankoadze.
 
Why do you enjoy the work that you do?
It gives me the opportunity to improve a community that I am also part of.
 
How do you feel the World Challenge teams benefit personally from their project experience?
There is always a sense of fulfilment with Challengers seeing that their efforts go a long way to improving the lives of the less privileged.
 
How do you feel the local community benefits from the World Challenge teams' work and support?
They get funds to buy materials to do intended projects and also the presence of the Challengers motivates more local people to help with the project work.
 
 
Which Community project have you been particularly proud of and why?
Last year when some Challengers moulded more than 1,000 five-inch cement blocks. This was exceptional because the Challengers, even though unskilled, were able to produce high quantities within a short period of time.
 
What sort of feedback do you get from the local community following the completion of a project?
The community is always appreciative and keen on keeping the relationship with World Challenge going.
 
Do you keep World Challenge teams updated after their work has been done and is that well-received?
Challengers are updated especially if projects are not completed before they return. But we normally get more responses from the Expedition Leaders.
 
Do you have a top tip, request or great idea you would like to share with future World Challenge teams visiting your country?
Challengers will learn more about their host country and community if they are more interactive, especially with the local folks they work with.
 
Castro Amoah, Principal of the Teabags Vocational Skills Centre, Ghana
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